Thomas Lowry's Ghost

Crowd outside Shinder’s news stand (Hennepin Av at 7th St, Minneapolis)  reading about the allied invasion of Normandy. June 6th, 1944 (with copy of the front page of that morning’s Minneapolis Tribune)

(images via MHS Visual Resources Database and Star Tribune)

Office of the Minneapolis Times newspaper, 4th Street between Marquette and Nicollet Avenues. (ca. 1910)
(image via Hennepin County Library - Minneapolis Photo Collection)

Office of the Minneapolis Times newspaper, 4th Street between Marquette and Nicollet Avenues. (ca. 1910)

(image via Hennepin County Library - Minneapolis Photo Collection)


Giant stone medallions fixed to the front of the building heralded sectors of the economy that were important to Minnesota in the 1940s: Mining, farming, tourism, milling, logging. A newspaper wouldn’t dare build such a headquarters today. “You mean you’re in favor of mining? And you support using animals for food?” People would accuse the publisher of being in the pocket of Big Wheat.
And that’s the point: In those days, newspaper publishers weren’t shy about letting the world know whose side they were on. The medallions on the building’s facade celebrated Minnesota, just as the giant globe in the building’s lobby celebrated Minnesota’s connection to the world. The celebration wasn’t lost on the hundreds of employees who passed through the doors every day.
It sounds corny, but a building like that made a guy square his shoulders a little when he showed up for work in the morning. It reminded him that he was working for something more than a paycheck — a good thing, too, considering what he probably thought of the paycheck.

(“The doomed Star Tribune building and the meaning of journalism”, image and text via MPR News)

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Giant stone medallions fixed to the front of the building heralded sectors of the economy that were important to Minnesota in the 1940s: Mining, farming, tourism, milling, logging. A newspaper wouldn’t dare build such a headquarters today. “You mean you’re in favor of mining? And you support using animals for food?” People would accuse the publisher of being in the pocket of Big Wheat.

And that’s the point: In those days, newspaper publishers weren’t shy about letting the world know whose side they were on. The medallions on the building’s facade celebrated Minnesota, just as the giant globe in the building’s lobby celebrated Minnesota’s connection to the world. The celebration wasn’t lost on the hundreds of employees who passed through the doors every day.

It sounds corny, but a building like that made a guy square his shoulders a little when he showed up for work in the morning. It reminded him that he was working for something more than a paycheck — a good thing, too, considering what he probably thought of the paycheck.

(“The doomed Star Tribune building and the meaning of journalism”, image and text via MPR News)

Shinder’s news stand, Minneapolis. (1920)
(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Shinder’s news stand, Minneapolis. (1920)

(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

City gives preliminary OK for demolition of Star Tribune building

Here’s an excerpt from the staff report on its origins:
“The subject property was constructed in 1919 and 1920 by the Nonpartisan League: the populist and somewhat socialist agrarian movement that swept the upper Midwest beginning in 1915 and which led to the formation of the Farmer Labor Party. The League, under the auspices of the Northwest Publishing Company, founded the Minnesota Daily Star (later named the Minneapolis Daily Star): one of Minneapolis’ many upstart papers audacious enough to challenge the dominant Minneapolis Journal and Minneapolis Tribune. The paper quickly faltered, falling into receivership by 1924.”

The six “medallions” on the front of the building, which represent the industries of the upper midwest, will be spared and incorporated to the new park on the site.
(image, from 1954, via MHS Visual Resources Database)

City gives preliminary OK for demolition of Star Tribune building

Here’s an excerpt from the staff report on its origins:

“The subject property was constructed in 1919 and 1920 by the Nonpartisan League: the populist and somewhat socialist agrarian movement that swept the upper Midwest beginning in 1915 and which led to the formation of the Farmer Labor Party. The League, under the auspices of the Northwest Publishing Company, founded the Minnesota Daily Star (later named the Minneapolis Daily Star): one of Minneapolis’ many upstart papers audacious enough to challenge the dominant Minneapolis Journal and Minneapolis Tribune. The paper quickly faltered, falling into receivership by 1924.”

The six “medallions” on the front of the building, which represent the industries of the upper midwest, will be spared and incorporated to the new park on the site.

(image, from 1954, via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Globe Building. 4th St, Minneapolis. (1943)
(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Globe Building. 4th St, Minneapolis. (1943)

(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)


"Our wives and daughters are no longer safe on the streets of Minneapolis." This old partizan political war cry that has done service in many a municipal campaign, can for once be truthful applied, for the execrable thoroughfare have for weeks imperiled both life and limb to pedestrians. When the heavy snows of January, February and March fell in high drifts the street car company with its scrapers pushed the snow as it fell from the tracks to either side. The sidewalks were cleared and the snow thrown upon the street, adding to the heighth of the ridges already formed. Thousands of teams have trampled it compactly, while successive thawing and freezing have formed an icy embankment to feet thick nearly, on the average, as hard as rock, running between the tracks and curbstones.

St. Paul Daily Globe. March 25, 1888.
(image and text via Library of Congress)

"Our wives and daughters are no longer safe on the streets of Minneapolis." This old partizan political war cry that has done service in many a municipal campaign, can for once be truthful applied, for the execrable thoroughfare have for weeks imperiled both life and limb to pedestrians. When the heavy snows of January, February and March fell in high drifts the street car company with its scrapers pushed the snow as it fell from the tracks to either side. The sidewalks were cleared and the snow thrown upon the street, adding to the heighth of the ridges already formed. Thousands of teams have trampled it compactly, while successive thawing and freezing have formed an icy embankment to feet thick nearly, on the average, as hard as rock, running between the tracks and curbstones.

St. Paul Daily Globe. March 25, 1888.

(image and text via Library of Congress)

By Sid Hartman
Minneapolis Daily Times

Ticket Manager Marsh Ryman reports that the football ducat sale is the highest since the start of the war. Mail order for season tickets closed Saturday. The estimated sale is around 9,500. This is far from the 17,000 that were sold in 1937, but a lot better than any of the war years. Incidentally the University of Minnesota is protected even if it can’t replace the Seahawk game. The season ticket book clearly states more than one game must be postponed before a refund is necessary.

However, this doesn’t mean the boys aren’t trying to get a game. They want one and are doing their best to line one up.

* * *

KASPER ‘SWEETHEART’ OF GOPHER VETS

“Sweetheart of the Gopher veterans” is Bobby Kasper. Some of the boys who have been around, like Bob Hanzlik, Red Williams, Bob Graiziger and Vic Kulbitski, can’t see how Bob can miss being a Big Ten star. … Pat Harder, the ex-Wisconsin flash, is still waiting for a discharge after a knee operation. Down at Madison they still have a faint hope Pat will be out in time to play some ball for them. … Elroy Hirsch, another ex-Wisconsin star, is a member of Dick Hanley’s Eltoro marines.

* * *

HANZLIK GETS LETTERS BACK FROM DEAD PALS

Bob Hanzlik still is getting back letters that he wrote to his Wisconsin teammates, Dave Schreiner and Tom Baumann, who were killed at Okinawa. Hanzlik wrote to Schreiner every week during the 18 months he was overseas. … Incidentally, Bob thinks Wisconsin got an awfully tough break when they lost Backfield Coach Howie O’Dell in 1942. Hanzlik says the Badgers were crazy about O’Dell and he had plenty to do with developing the ‘42 club. O’Dell coached in the spring and then left in the fall to take a head coaching job at Yale.

Here’s part of my close, personal friend’s first column. Happy 92nd birthday, Sidney! We should go find him at Vescio’s in St. Louis Park and give him a big kiss.

T-shirt commemorating the death of the Minneapolis Star newspaper.
For those who don’t remember or were too young to know, Minneapolis had multiple newspapers. There was the Globe, Journal, Tribune, Star, and probably a few others that I’m forgetting. Years ago, the Cowles family ran both the Star and the Tribune. The Tribune was printed for the daytime, and the Star for the evening. In 1982, the two papers were merged into one daily edition. This shirt was found at a local art-crawl and given to me by my ex-wife. I was happy to be reacquainted with it recently.

T-shirt commemorating the death of the Minneapolis Star newspaper.

For those who don’t remember or were too young to know, Minneapolis had multiple newspapers. There was the Globe, Journal, Tribune, Star, and probably a few others that I’m forgetting. Years ago, the Cowles family ran both the Star and the Tribune. The Tribune was printed for the daytime, and the Star for the evening. In 1982, the two papers were merged into one daily edition. This shirt was found at a local art-crawl and given to me by my ex-wife. I was happy to be reacquainted with it recently.