Thomas Lowry's Ghost

Minneapolis is a New England town on the upper Mississippi. The metropolis of Northwest, it is the metropolis also of Norway and Sweden in America. Indeed, it is second largest Scandinavian city in the world. But Yankees straight from Down East settled the town and their New England spirit predominates. They had Bayard Taylor lecture there in the early days of the settlement; they made it the seat of the University of Minnesota. Yet even now when the town has grown to a population of more than 200,000, you feel that there is something Western about it too — a Yankee with a small Puritan head, an open prairie heart, and a great, big Scandinavian body.

The story of Mayor “Doc” Ames and rampant corruption within Minneapolis City Hall, by muckraker Lincoln Steffens. (1903)
(image and text via Google Books)

Minneapolis is a New England town on the upper Mississippi. The metropolis of Northwest, it is the metropolis also of Norway and Sweden in America. Indeed, it is second largest Scandinavian city in the world. But Yankees straight from Down East settled the town and their New England spirit predominates. They had Bayard Taylor lecture there in the early days of the settlement; they made it the seat of the University of Minnesota. Yet even now when the town has grown to a population of more than 200,000, you feel that there is something Western about it too — a Yankee with a small Puritan head, an open prairie heart, and a great, big Scandinavian body.

The story of Mayor “Doc” Ames and rampant corruption within Minneapolis City Hall, by muckraker Lincoln Steffens. (1903)

(image and text via Google Books)

Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery, Lake St. and Cedar Ave. (1939)
(image via Library of Congress)

Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery, Lake St. and Cedar Ave. (1939)

(image via Library of Congress)

Churchill’s lecture at 8:15 that Friday evening was at the Lyceum Theater, down the street from his hotel on Hennepin between Seventh and Eighth Streets. Ticket prices ranged from 50 cents for the cheapest seats to $1.50 for the most expensive, the equivalent today of about $10.00 to $30.00. After an introduction by a member of the sponsoring Teachers’ Club, Churchill delivered his talk, illustrated with about 100 slides projected by a “magic lantern,” an early slide projector that used a kerosene lamp to illuminate glass slides holding photographic images.

His audience that night was not disappointed. His lecture, according to the Journal, “was as absorbingly interesting as it was unaffected and unhackneyed. A story of thrilling occurrences was told in the most direct, colloquial fashion … The frequent flashes of humor were the features of the lecture.” The review in the St. Paul Dispatch was equally favorable. “Lieut. Churchill seems English only in one thing, and that is his accent. His sense of dry humor is peculiarly American. He is open-hearted and perfectly fair in speaking of the good qualities of the Boers as fighters. What he does not admire about them he leaves unsaid.”

(fist image via MHS Visual Resources Database, second image and text via)

Ads for various acts appearing in 1962 at The Loon Club, 2935 Nicollet Ave, Minneapolis.
(image via)

Ads for various acts appearing in 1962 at The Loon Club, 2935 Nicollet Ave, Minneapolis.

(image via)

Ad for Dayton’s Department Store from the July 27th, 1904 edition of the Minneapolis Journal.
(image via Library of Congress)

Ad for Dayton’s Department Store from the July 27th, 1904 edition of the Minneapolis Journal.

(image via Library of Congress)

Ad for Grateful Dead show from February 2nd, 1969. Review from the next day’s Minneapolis Tribune:

GRATEFUL DEAD SOCK IT TO 2,000 MUSIC LOVERS
The Labor Temple was packed. The audience, mostly late-high-school and college-age youth, completely filled the chairless main floor, sitting or standing. And all other seats and aisles were taken in the balcony. As a preliminary to the Grateful Dead, a local group called the Blackwood Apology held forth for an hour or so with the same sort of electric sound. It came on like just what it was: hundreds of watts of electrified musical power pounding out of great stacks and racks of amplifiers. And above, lights flashed multicolored, changing images of psychedelia on great wide screens. Making it happen was the Grateful Dead, a group billed as the leader of underground rock, as the nationally famed but uncompromised original. The more than 2,000 young people who jammed the Minneapolis Labor Temple to hear them Sunday night took it quite coolly. They liked it, they clapped a lot, and some of them danced. But mainly, they did what you do with this kind of youth art: They experienced it. After a long delay for setting up their nearly 100 pieces of equipment, the Grateful Dead came on with a sound like the end of a bad trip. It was a horrendously penetrating hum from an amplifier gone mad. But when they got the amplifier squared away, they showed that they can play as well as make noise. Using some incredibly complex tempos and fine improvisations, they did the mixture of jazz and rock and folk that - along with the lights and, in some cases, marijuana - has been turning on people around the country for several years.

(image and text via Twin Cities Music Highlights)

Ad for Grateful Dead show from February 2nd, 1969. Review from the next day’s Minneapolis Tribune:

GRATEFUL DEAD SOCK IT TO 2,000 MUSIC LOVERS

The Labor Temple was packed. The audience, mostly late-high-school and college-age youth, completely filled the chairless main floor, sitting or standing. And all other seats and aisles were taken in the balcony. As a preliminary to the Grateful Dead, a local group called the Blackwood Apology held forth for an hour or so with the same sort of electric sound. It came on like just what it was: hundreds of watts of electrified musical power pounding out of great stacks and racks of amplifiers. And above, lights flashed multicolored, changing images of psychedelia on great wide screens. Making it happen was the Grateful Dead, a group billed as the leader of underground rock, as the nationally famed but uncompromised original. The more than 2,000 young people who jammed the Minneapolis Labor Temple to hear them Sunday night took it quite coolly. They liked it, they clapped a lot, and some of them danced. But mainly, they did what you do with this kind of youth art: They experienced it. After a long delay for setting up their nearly 100 pieces of equipment, the Grateful Dead came on with a sound like the end of a bad trip. It was a horrendously penetrating hum from an amplifier gone mad. But when they got the amplifier squared away, they showed that they can play as well as make noise. Using some incredibly complex tempos and fine improvisations, they did the mixture of jazz and rock and folk that - along with the lights and, in some cases, marijuana - has been turning on people around the country for several years.

(image and text via Twin Cities Music Highlights)

Ad from the February 10th, 1939 issue of the Minneapolis Labor Review.
(image via Labor Review Archive)

Ad from the February 10th, 1939 issue of the Minneapolis Labor Review.

(image via Labor Review Archive)

Marquette and Washington Avenues, looking towards Main Post Office. Minneapolis (ca. 1935)
(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Marquette and Washington Avenues, looking towards Main Post Office. Minneapolis (ca. 1935)

(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

"Exterior view of White Castle number 6. Located at 8 North Washington Ave. in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Opened on February 24, 1927 and was remodeled in 1930. It was closed in April of 1936 due to increased rent."
(via)

"Exterior view of White Castle number 6. Located at 8 North Washington Ave. in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Opened on February 24, 1927 and was remodeled in 1930. It was closed in April of 1936 due to increased rent."

(via)

"Flower Gardens, Loring Park, Minneapolis, Minn." (1938)
(image via LakesnWoods)

"Flower Gardens, Loring Park, Minneapolis, Minn." (1938)

(image via LakesnWoods)