Thomas Lowry's Ghost

Aug 18

All Minneapolis Men are Vain and Women Can Be Made So
 
Where Do All the Boys Get Those Cute Waves in Hair?
 

Buy ‘Em at the Beauty Parlors, Just as the Girls Do, Say Those Who Earn a Living by Making Two Marcels Grow Where None Grew Before.
Cub Reporter a Sacrifice on Altar of Duty
Hair May Get Straight Again But Will Never Look the Same.
“THIS fellow Blackie said he had to have his hair marcelled because he was going to a dance.”
Miss Elizabeth Erickson, lady barber with a shop at Nicollet and Lake, was telling the Cub Reporter how if it wasn’t one thing it was another in the means of livelihood she had chosen.
“Blackie, that was what we called him because we didn’t know his real name, was a handsome young man with long blue-black hair that was broken in tis glossy smoothness by a deep wave. The girls always enjoyed shaving him because he had such a pleasant way with him.
“We hadn’t seen him for a month or more. Then he came in in a tearing hurry, jammed himself into a chair, and demanded: ‘Gimme a marcel quick.’ His hair was as straight as yours.
“ ‘What do you think this is, a beauty parlor?’ I asked him.
“ ‘Aw, have a heart,’ he begged like a child. ‘The place where I usually get it done is closed, and my girl never saw me with it straight. For the love of Mike, how can I take her to a dance like this?’
“I didn’t see what I could do, but one of the girls got a curling iron, and in half an hour he looked like himself again.”

(image and text via Yesterday’s News)

All Minneapolis Men are Vain
and Women Can Be Made So

 
Where Do All the Boys Get Those Cute Waves in Hair?
 
Buy ‘Em at the Beauty Parlors, Just as the Girls Do, Say Those Who Earn a Living by Making Two Marcels Grow Where None Grew Before.

Cub Reporter a Sacrifice on Altar of Duty

Hair May Get Straight Again But Will Never Look the Same.
“THIS fellow Blackie said he had to have his hair marcelled because he was going to a dance.”
Miss Elizabeth Erickson, lady barber with a shop at Nicollet and Lake, was telling the Cub Reporter how if it wasn’t one thing it was another in the means of livelihood she had chosen.
“Blackie, that was what we called him because we didn’t know his real name, was a handsome young man with long blue-black hair that was broken in tis glossy smoothness by a deep wave. The girls always enjoyed shaving him because he had such a pleasant way with him.
“We hadn’t seen him for a month or more. Then he came in in a tearing hurry, jammed himself into a chair, and demanded: ‘Gimme a marcel quick.’ His hair was as straight as yours.
“ ‘What do you think this is, a beauty parlor?’ I asked him.
“ ‘Aw, have a heart,’ he begged like a child. ‘The place where I usually get it done is closed, and my girl never saw me with it straight. For the love of Mike, how can I take her to a dance like this?’
“I didn’t see what I could do, but one of the girls got a curling iron, and in half an hour he looked like himself again.”
(image and text via Yesterday’s News)

Aug 17

Plymouth Building. Hennepin Ave at 6th St, Minneapolis (ca. 1918)
(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Plymouth Building. Hennepin Ave at 6th St, Minneapolis (ca. 1918)

(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Aug 16

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Aug 15

Lithograph of Minneapolis (1886)
(image via Library of Congress)

Lithograph of Minneapolis (1886)

(image via Library of Congress)

Aug 14

Front page of the Minneapolis Morning Tribune from August 14th, 1914.
(image via Yesterday’s News)

Front page of the Minneapolis Morning Tribune from August 14th, 1914.

(image via Yesterday’s News)

Aug 13

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Aug 12

Streetcar on East Hennepin Ave at 4th St, Minneapolis (1951)
(image via Minnesota Reflections)

Streetcar on East Hennepin Ave at 4th St, Minneapolis (1951)

(image via Minnesota Reflections)

Aug 11

"It all started with Frank Berenberg, who came to America from Romania in 1900. The story goes that he was so enamored of the freedom of America, and of Abraham Lincoln in particular, that he named his first son Abraham and his business Lincoln.

Frank opened a bakery on Lyndale Ave. in Minneapolis in 1933, and brought sons Irving, Abraham, and Morris into the business in about 1935. As of 1951, there were two locations and goods were also available at Snyder Drug Stores.  Below left is an ad from the Minneapolis Spokesman, the city’s black newspaper, from June 8, 1951:

image

The store on Olson Memorial Highway (Highway 55) was a “cold shop” where baked goods were sold but not made. That location was displaced in 1957 with the improvement of Highway 55, and the operation was moved to St. Louis Park.”

(text and image via St. Louis Park Historical Society)

Aug 10

Ad in the Minneapolis Journal for sightseeing tours of the Twin Cities (1906)
(image via Library of Congress)

Ad in the Minneapolis Journal for sightseeing tours of the Twin Cities (1906)

(image via Library of Congress)

Aug 09

Ad for Casanova Cafe, Minneapolis (1946)
(image via Minneapolis Labor Review archives)

Ad for Casanova Cafe, Minneapolis (1946)

(image via Minneapolis Labor Review archives)