Thomas Lowry's Ghost
August 31st, 1903 ad in the Minneapolis Journal for “Minneapolis Day” at the Minnesota State Fair.

In the spirit of generous rivalry let us make ‘Minneapolis Day’ the banner day of the week

(image via Library of Congress)

August 31st, 1903 ad in the Minneapolis Journal for “Minneapolis Day” at the Minnesota State Fair.

In the spirit of generous rivalry let us make ‘Minneapolis Day’ the banner day of the week

(image via Library of Congress)

COZY HOMES On the North Side Postcard of homes in the Homewood and Farwell Park areas of North Minneapolis (1920)
(image via Hammers and High Heels)

COZY HOMES On the North Side Postcard of homes in the Homewood and Farwell Park areas of North Minneapolis (1920)

(image via Hammers and High Heels)

Dupont Cash Market. 928 Dupont Ave North, Minneapolis (1935)
(image via Minnesota Reflections)

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Dupont Cash Market. 928 Dupont Ave North, Minneapolis (1935)

(image via Minnesota Reflections)

All Minneapolis Men are Vain and Women Can Be Made So
 
Where Do All the Boys Get Those Cute Waves in Hair?
 

Buy ‘Em at the Beauty Parlors, Just as the Girls Do, Say Those Who Earn a Living by Making Two Marcels Grow Where None Grew Before.
Cub Reporter a Sacrifice on Altar of Duty
Hair May Get Straight Again But Will Never Look the Same.
“THIS fellow Blackie said he had to have his hair marcelled because he was going to a dance.”
Miss Elizabeth Erickson, lady barber with a shop at Nicollet and Lake, was telling the Cub Reporter how if it wasn’t one thing it was another in the means of livelihood she had chosen.
“Blackie, that was what we called him because we didn’t know his real name, was a handsome young man with long blue-black hair that was broken in tis glossy smoothness by a deep wave. The girls always enjoyed shaving him because he had such a pleasant way with him.
“We hadn’t seen him for a month or more. Then he came in in a tearing hurry, jammed himself into a chair, and demanded: ‘Gimme a marcel quick.’ His hair was as straight as yours.
“ ‘What do you think this is, a beauty parlor?’ I asked him.
“ ‘Aw, have a heart,’ he begged like a child. ‘The place where I usually get it done is closed, and my girl never saw me with it straight. For the love of Mike, how can I take her to a dance like this?’
“I didn’t see what I could do, but one of the girls got a curling iron, and in half an hour he looked like himself again.”

(image and text via Yesterday’s News)

All Minneapolis Men are Vain
and Women Can Be Made So

 
Where Do All the Boys Get Those Cute Waves in Hair?
 
Buy ‘Em at the Beauty Parlors, Just as the Girls Do, Say Those Who Earn a Living by Making Two Marcels Grow Where None Grew Before.

Cub Reporter a Sacrifice on Altar of Duty

Hair May Get Straight Again But Will Never Look the Same.
“THIS fellow Blackie said he had to have his hair marcelled because he was going to a dance.”
Miss Elizabeth Erickson, lady barber with a shop at Nicollet and Lake, was telling the Cub Reporter how if it wasn’t one thing it was another in the means of livelihood she had chosen.
“Blackie, that was what we called him because we didn’t know his real name, was a handsome young man with long blue-black hair that was broken in tis glossy smoothness by a deep wave. The girls always enjoyed shaving him because he had such a pleasant way with him.
“We hadn’t seen him for a month or more. Then he came in in a tearing hurry, jammed himself into a chair, and demanded: ‘Gimme a marcel quick.’ His hair was as straight as yours.
“ ‘What do you think this is, a beauty parlor?’ I asked him.
“ ‘Aw, have a heart,’ he begged like a child. ‘The place where I usually get it done is closed, and my girl never saw me with it straight. For the love of Mike, how can I take her to a dance like this?’
“I didn’t see what I could do, but one of the girls got a curling iron, and in half an hour he looked like himself again.”
(image and text via Yesterday’s News)
Plymouth Building. Hennepin Ave at 6th St, Minneapolis (ca. 1918)
(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Plymouth Building. Hennepin Ave at 6th St, Minneapolis (ca. 1918)

(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Matchbook for Augie’s Theatre Lounge (year unknown)

(images via Twin Cities Music Highlights)

Lithograph of Minneapolis (1886)
(image via Library of Congress)

Lithograph of Minneapolis (1886)

(image via Library of Congress)

Front page of the Minneapolis Morning Tribune from August 14th, 1914.
(image via Yesterday’s News)

Front page of the Minneapolis Morning Tribune from August 14th, 1914.

(image via Yesterday’s News)

Pharlsee society women and their meal tickets came to what the newspapers call the Gateway, but what in reality is the Minneapolis slave market, Monday night to oggle and scoff at the bar maids who have been give much publicity of late by the daily papers.

They rolled up in limousines, lifted their penciled eyelids — no, not their skirts, for the skirts of society dames are perhaps even shorter than those of bar maids — and with a superior air examined their sisters much as a scientist would inspect some peculiar bug or newly discovered animal under the microscope.

[…]

The Gateway, or the slave market, whichever you wish to call it, will never be cleaned up until the capitalist system is cleaned up. It is the height of hypocrisy for daily papers that support the capitalist system to sneer at the bar maids of the Gateway. And it won’t be cleaned up for awhile because some of our best citizens gain their incomes from slave mart property.

Meanwhile replace the electric sign of the Northwestern bank with an advertisement declaring this is the gateway to hell, the gateway to the capitalist hell which makes possible the Lowry hill heaven of those who scoff at bar maids who though in a questionable business are of more use to society than the soft handed scoffers from Lowry hill.

(text and 1st image, from 8/19/1921, via Minneapolis Labor Review archives. 2nd image, from 1893, via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Streetcar on East Hennepin Ave at 4th St, Minneapolis (1951)
(image via Minnesota Reflections)

Streetcar on East Hennepin Ave at 4th St, Minneapolis (1951)

(image via Minnesota Reflections)