Thomas Lowry's Ghost
The Bismark Bar. 119 Washington Ave North, Minneapolis (ca. 1902)

Cussler was the owner of the bar, which was the second bar of that name in town. Group of 5 men and a dog are posed in front of the bar. Note signs advertising Gluek’s Beer.

(image via Hennepin County Library - Minneapolis Photo Collection)

The Bismark Bar. 119 Washington Ave North, Minneapolis (ca. 1902)

Cussler was the owner of the bar, which was the second bar of that name in town. Group of 5 men and a dog are posed in front of the bar. Note signs advertising Gluek’s Beer.

(image via Hennepin County Library - Minneapolis Photo Collection)

Herman’s Lunch, 16 S. 9th St. Minneapolis (1955)
(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Herman’s Lunch, 16 S. 9th St. Minneapolis (1955)

(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Passover Seder at Irving and Sonia Leveneson’s residence, Minneapolis (1943)
(image via Minnesota Reflections)

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Passover Seder at Irving and Sonia Leveneson’s residence, Minneapolis (1943)

(image via Minnesota Reflections)


This map was published as part of a Minneapolis police survey compiled in 1930 by August Vollmer, who was known as the father of American criminology. As chief of police in Berkeley, California, Vollmer developed systems of record-keeping and training that were adopted throughout the United States.
This diagram shows police liquor raids clustered in the old Gateway neighborhood on the banks of the Mississippi River. This was the heart of the liquor patrol district. Enshrined in the city charter in the 1880s, this ordinance required bars and liquor stores to be concentrated in select parts of town, with the rationale that police could more easily control liquor-fueled crime if all of these types of businesses were in one place.
A constitutional ban on alcohol did little to slow the consumption of liquor in the Minneapolis Gateway. “Drinking  and the sale of alcoholic beverages never really stopped in the Gateway,” historian David Rosheim concluded in his history of the neighborhood. “It probably never even paused.”
After the Volstead Act, Gateway saloons were converted into “soft-drink bars,” which supposedly limited their offerings to sandwiches and soft-drinks. The Salvation Army was the first to open this kind of establishment; it was probably the only one in the neighborhood to limit its patrons to root beer. Most Gateway soft-drink bars made their money from moonshine and prostitution. And they came under the control of local bootleggers, who worked with the police department’s Purity Squad to ensure they could operate without interference. This system of payoffs was described by Paul Ferrell, who described the Minneapolis Gateway of the 1920s in his memoir Michigan Mossback. Ferrell does not paint a flattering view of the Mill City.
Vollmer’s liquor raid map does sheds little light on the actual consumption of alcohol in Prohibition-era Minneapolis. At best, it illuminates which establishments were late on their required payments to the Purity Squad.
The liquor patrol limits were rescinded in 1974, though it is still difficult in Minneapolis to get a liquor license or serve liquor outside of these historic limits.

(image and text via the Historyapolis Project)

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This map was published as part of a Minneapolis police survey compiled in 1930 by August Vollmer, who was known as the father of American criminology. As chief of police in Berkeley, California, Vollmer developed systems of record-keeping and training that were adopted throughout the United States.

This diagram shows police liquor raids clustered in the old Gateway neighborhood on the banks of the Mississippi River. This was the heart of the liquor patrol district. Enshrined in the city charter in the 1880s, this ordinance required bars and liquor stores to be concentrated in select parts of town, with the rationale that police could more easily control liquor-fueled crime if all of these types of businesses were in one place.

A constitutional ban on alcohol did little to slow the consumption of liquor in the Minneapolis Gateway. “Drinking  and the sale of alcoholic beverages never really stopped in the Gateway,” historian David Rosheim concluded in his history of the neighborhood. “It probably never even paused.”

After the Volstead Act, Gateway saloons were converted into “soft-drink bars,” which supposedly limited their offerings to sandwiches and soft-drinks. The Salvation Army was the first to open this kind of establishment; it was probably the only one in the neighborhood to limit its patrons to root beer. Most Gateway soft-drink bars made their money from moonshine and prostitution. And they came under the control of local bootleggers, who worked with the police department’s Purity Squad to ensure they could operate without interference. This system of payoffs was described by Paul Ferrell, who described the Minneapolis Gateway of the 1920s in his memoir Michigan Mossback. Ferrell does not paint a flattering view of the Mill City.

Vollmer’s liquor raid map does sheds little light on the actual consumption of alcohol in Prohibition-era Minneapolis. At best, it illuminates which establishments were late on their required payments to the Purity Squad.

The liquor patrol limits were rescinded in 1974, though it is still difficult in Minneapolis to get a liquor license or serve liquor outside of these historic limits.

(image and text via the Historyapolis Project)

Steeple Jacks at Maurice Rothschild & Company. Nicollet Ave and 4th St,    Minneapolis (ca. 1925)
(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Steeple Jacks at Maurice Rothschild & Company. Nicollet Ave and 4th St,    Minneapolis (ca. 1925)

(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Federal Reserve Bank and Soo Line Building. 5th St. at Marquette Ave, Minneapolis (1924)
(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Federal Reserve Bank and Soo Line Building. 5th St. at Marquette Ave, Minneapolis (1924)

(image via MHS Visual Resources Database)

Advertisement for Lake Street Liquor Store, Minneapolis (ca. 1945)
(image via Minnesota Reflections)

Advertisement for Lake Street Liquor Store, Minneapolis (ca. 1945)

(image via Minnesota Reflections)


When Gail Wittels, 16, 5537 Woodlawn Blvd., shows up for rehearsal of Roosevelt High School Rockettes, she doesn’t put her best foot forward — she puts her game leg forward (right). Out skiing on the season’s multistratous snow, Gail suffered a spiral fracture of her right leg. Consequently, she will be on the sidelines when the dance troupe appears at the school’s talent show next Friday in the school auditorium. She also will miss the spring fashion show April 5, also at the school. The fashion show will be a salute to spring, with students, parents and members of the school staff serving as models. A quartet, the “Teddy Tones,” will present song fashions. Rockettes (above, from left) are Dawn Peterson, 15, 4213 18th Av. S.; Pam Filmore, 16, 3940 17th Av. S.; Kathy Nelson, 17, 3120 Wenonah Place; Mary Keohane, 17, 5156 30th Av. S.; Lynn Scheele, 16, 4252 Nokomis Av.; Joan Johnson, 17, 5429 31st Av. S.; Kay Kwakenat, 16, 5337 Nokomis Av.; Nora Monahan, 17, 4916 Aldrich Av. S.; Diane Franzen, 17, 4104 20th Av. S.; Lani Greenfield, 17, 3916 29th Av. S.; Jacquie Spence, 15, 4933 Nokomis Av.; Mary Jo Kunz, 16, 5256 45th Av. S., and Gail cheerfully resting her weight on her good leg. [Pictured separately were Pam Anderson, 18, 3900 18th Av. S.; Karin Wakefield, 17, 4151 24th Av. S.; Frances Malmsten, 17, 4740 17th Av. S., and Jerilyn Johnson, 18, 3504 43rd Av. S.] 

(Image and text via Star Tribune’s Yesterday’s News blog)

When Gail Wittels, 16, 5537 Woodlawn Blvd., shows up for rehearsal of Roosevelt High School Rockettes, she doesn’t put her best foot forward — she puts her game leg forward (right). Out skiing on the season’s multistratous snow, Gail suffered a spiral fracture of her right leg. Consequently, she will be on the sidelines when the dance troupe appears at the school’s talent show next Friday in the school auditorium. She also will miss the spring fashion show April 5, also at the school. The fashion show will be a salute to spring, with students, parents and members of the school staff serving as models. A quartet, the “Teddy Tones,” will present song fashions. Rockettes (above, from left) are Dawn Peterson, 15, 4213 18th Av. S.; Pam Filmore, 16, 3940 17th Av. S.; Kathy Nelson, 17, 3120 Wenonah Place; Mary Keohane, 17, 5156 30th Av. S.; Lynn Scheele, 16, 4252 Nokomis Av.; Joan Johnson, 17, 5429 31st Av. S.; Kay Kwakenat, 16, 5337 Nokomis Av.; Nora Monahan, 17, 4916 Aldrich Av. S.; Diane Franzen, 17, 4104 20th Av. S.; Lani Greenfield, 17, 3916 29th Av. S.; Jacquie Spence, 15, 4933 Nokomis Av.; Mary Jo Kunz, 16, 5256 45th Av. S., and Gail cheerfully resting her weight on her good leg. [Pictured separately were Pam Anderson, 18, 3900 18th Av. S.; Karin Wakefield, 17, 4151 24th Av. S.; Frances Malmsten, 17, 4740 17th Av. S., and Jerilyn Johnson, 18, 3504 43rd Av. S.] 

(Image and text via Star Tribune’s Yesterday’s News blog)

hclib:

That Was Then…This Is Now

With the Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival in full swing, we’ve got our minds on movies—movies filmed in the Twin Cities, to be exact!

The stills above are part of a press packet from the movie “That Was Then…This Is Now”, which was filmed in Minneapolis and St. Paul in 1984. The movie, based on the best-selling young adult novel by S.E. Hinton and starring Emilio Estevez, Craig Sheffer, Kim Delaney, and Morgan Freeman, among others, was shot using a wide variety of locations from Washington High School in St. Paul, to the river flats at the University of Minnesota.

Facts from the press packet (available in the Special Collections vertical files):

  • Shooting began August 20, 1984 and was to be completed in 6 weeks.
  • A bit of Hollywood magic was needed to transform Nicollet Island’s Marvel Foods Warehouse into an abandoned crash pad for bums and other unsavory characters.
  • The Minnesota Historical Society doubled for the State Reformatory.
  • A popular St. Paul bar, Spanky’s Saloon, was dressed to become “Charlie’s Bar”. Following the shooting, the owner nicknamed the saloon “Spanky’s of Hollywood.”
  • For high school dance sequences, over 300 students volunteered as extras to dance in a Wednesday night shooting—they were asked to return Thursday and Friday, undaunted and ready to keep dancing, even without music (so as not to interfere with dialogue). They were rewarded with a live band brought in to set the tone for the break and slam dancers.
  • The cast experienced a true Minnesota summer, with daytime highs of 95 degrees and late night lows of 33.

Check out the movie from HCL to see what other local sights you can spot. For recent films made and/or filmed in Minnesota, check out the MN Made lineup at MSPIFF, April 3-19, 2014

Thanks, stuffaboutminneapolis and thomaslowrysghost for the Tumblr suggestion!

Nicollet Mall at 8th St, Minneapolis (ca 1967)
(image via City of Minneapolis)

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Nicollet Mall at 8th St, Minneapolis (ca 1967)

(image via City of Minneapolis)